Pupil Premium Strategy

In 2020-2021 Lincoln Castle Academy expects to receive around £345,000 in Pupil Premium funding. We write to parents before the beginning of each school year with our annual Pupil Premium offer letter to set out the bespoke interventions that we use at Lincoln Castle Academy.

Click here PP Strategy 2020-2021 Nov update 2020 to view Pupil Premium Strategy 2020-2021.

Click each link to view the following documents:
Letter to parents September 2020 service mentors
Letter to parents September 2020
Y7 PP Offer September 2020
Y8 PP Offer September 2020
Y9 PP Offer September 2020
Y10 PP Offer September 2020
Y11 PP Offer September 2020

What is Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011. It was allocated to children from low-income families who were known to be eligible for free school meals, and children who had been looked after continuously for more than six months. Eligibility for the Pupil Premium for 2012–13 was extended to pupils who have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as the Ever6 Free School Meals measure). Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months, and a smaller amount for the children of service personnel Schools are free to spend the Pupil Premium as they see fit. However, they are accountable for how they use the additional funding to support pupils from low-income families and the other target groups. New measures have been included in the performance tables that show the achievement of pupils who attract the Pupil Premium.

The aim of Pupil Premium is to:

  • raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils of all abilities to reach their potential
  • support children and young people with parents in the regular armed forces

It is up to school leaders to decide how to spend the pupil premium. This is because school leaders are best-placed to assess their pupils' needs and use funding to improve attainment. Evidence suggests that pupil premium spending is most effective when schools use a tiered approach, targeting spending across the following 3 areas below but focusing on teaching quality - investing in learning and development for teachers.

Teaching

Schools arrange training and professional development for all their staff to improve the impact of teaching and learning for pupils.

Academic support

Schools should decide on the main issues stopping their pupils from succeeding at school and use the pupil premium to buy extra help.

Wider approaches

This may include non-academic use of the pupil premium such as:

  • school breakfast clubs
  • subsidised music lessons for disadvantaged students
  • provision of equipment and resources

What is the Service Pupil Premium?

The Department for Education introduced the Service pupil premium (SPP) in April 2011 in recognition of the specific challenges children from service families face and as part of the commitment to delivering the armed forces covenant.

State schools, academies and free schools in England, which have children of service families in school years reception to year 11, can receive the SPP funding. It is designed to assist the school in providing the additional support that these children may need and is currently worth £310 per service child who meets the eligibility criteria.

The Pupil Premium Grant per-pupil rate for 2020 to 2021 is as follows:

Disadvantaged pupils Pupil premium per pupil
Pupils in year groups reception to year 6 recorded as
Ever 6 free school meals (FSM)
£1,345
Pupils in years 7 to 11 recorded as Ever 6 FSM £955
Looked-after children (LAC) defined in the Children Act 1989
as one who is in the care of, or provided with accommodation
by an English local authority
£2,345
Children who have ceased to be looked after by a local authority in
England and Wales because of adoption, a special guardianship order,
or child arrangements order (previously known as a residence order)
£2,345

 

Service children Service premium per pupil
Pupils in year groups reception to year 11 recorded as Ever 6 service child or in receipt of a child pension from the Ministry of Defence £310

Eligibility

Ever 6 free school meals The pupil premium for 2020 to 2021 will include pupils recorded in the January 2020 school census who have had a recorded period of FSM eligibility since May 2014, as well as those first recorded as eligible at January 2020.

Children adopted from care or who have left care The pupil premium for 2020 to 2021 will include pupils recorded in the January 2020 school census and alternative provision census, who were looked after by an English or Welsh local authority immediately before being adopted, or who left local authority care on a special guardianship order or child arrangements order (previously known as a residence order). These are collectively referred to as post-LAC in these conditions of grant.

Ever 6 service child For the purposes of these grant conditions, Ever 6 service child means a pupil recorded in the January 2020 school census who was eligible for the service child premium since the January 2015 census as well as those recorded as a service child for the first time on the January 2020 school census

Eligibility criteria for SPP

Pupils attract SPP if they meet one of the following criteria:

  •  one of their parents is serving in the regular armed forces (including pupils with a parent who is on full commitment as part of the full time reserve service)
  • they have been registered as a ‘service child’ on a school census since 2016, see footnote [footnote 1]
  • one of their parents died whilst serving in the armed forces and the pupil receives a pension under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme or the War Pensions Scheme

The purpose of the Service pupil premium

 Eligible schools receive the SPP so that they can offer mainly pastoral support during challenging times and to help mitigate the negative impact on service children of family mobility or parental deployment. Mobility is when a service family is posted from one location to another, including overseas and within the UK. Deployment is when a service person is serving away from home for a period of time. This could be a 6 to 9-month tour of duty, a training course or an exercise which could last for a few weeks.

How Service pupil premium differs from the pupil premium

 The SPP is there for schools to provide mainly pastoral support for service children, whereas the pupil premium (PP) was introduced to raise attainment and accelerate progress within disadvantaged groups.

Schools should not combine SPP with the main PP funding and the spending of each premium should be accounted for separately. SPP should not be used to subsidise routine school activity (trips, music lessons etc.).